Craziness

It is 8:27 PM on Thursday April 26th, 2018.  We had pizza night and I always regret pizza night right after I’ve eaten too many pieces.

I named this post ‘craziness’ due to a couple of thoughts running through my mind.

  1.  Artificial Intelligence

Recently I’ve started doing the jumble in the mornings in The Columbus Dispatch.  This is my hometown newspaper and I used to do the jumble a lot with my study hall teacher Mrs. Hebert.  It started out a little slow but over time I can now figure the daily jumble out pretty quickly although I’m only 50% on the Sunday, harder version.

Zelda – Breath of the Wild

I had always wanted to play Zelda ever since the the very first one came out in 1987.

First there was Atari, which I remember playing from my earliest memories.  One of my favorite memories in fact was going over to my older neighbor Kevin Heinzenberger’s house and we played Joust together in his room on the top floor.  I remember laughing historically as those nights rode around on birds trying not to get hit, they would go so fast!  I laughed so hard tears came out of my eyes and I was very sad when it was time to go back home.  That is a memory that is burned into my brain and I’ll never forget.

Lapham’s Quarterly – Fear

I don’t believe ‘enjoyed’ is the right adjective to describe how I felt reading Lapham’s Quarterly – Fear.  What is the right word if you continually want to do something yet it causes anxiety and fear while you do it?

It is not that reading this edition made me afraid; it is that it called attention to the abundant anxiety in my own life which was exacerbated in reading about the anxiety and fear of others in this edition.

Jim Carrey quote

Got this from The Elephant Journal and thought it was worth keeping.
Link: https://www.elephantjournal.com/2017/11/jim-carrey-explains-depression-in-the-best-way-ive-ever-heard/


Jim Carrey shares the startling realization he came to after years of fame: it’s totally pointless to spend our whole lives creating and curating some specific identity for ourselves.

This is all ego: desiring to be important, to be someone, to matter. In reality, this grasping at a singular identity brings us only pain and suffering, for three main reasons. One, it introduces a separation between us and all other beings that dishonors our inherent, interconnected nature. Two, it deludes us into thinking that things are not supposed to change—that we are not supposed to change. Three, it leads us away from resting in our own basic goodness, as it makes us feel that we aren’t enough just as we are, right now.

つみきのいえ (The House of Small Cubes) – ‘One Life’ and the brevity of life

Last night I saw the short film つみきのいえ, ‘The House of Small Cubes.’  It is of an old man whose village has flooded over may years and so he continually must build another level to his house to stay above water.  In the middle of every cube is a trap door leading to the lower, flooded cube which continues all the way to the bottom.